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  1. #41
    Senior Member Camo tung's Avatar
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    No pressure FH lol!

    Keep us up to date with your hunting endeavours.
    "It is an absolute truism that law-abiding, armed citizens pose no threat to other law-abiding citizens."

    Ammo, camo and things that go "blammo".

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    FlyingHigh (07-28-2020)

  3. #42
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camo tung View Post
    No pressure FH lol!

    Keep us up to date with your hunting endeavours.
    None whatsoever apparently. LOL. I'm hoping to get out and put boots on the ground in another area this weekend. Report to follow.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

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    Camo tung (07-28-2020)

  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drache View Post
    I just moved to Dawson Creek so I have to relearn my hunting all over again. Going out hopefully tomorrow a little.
    Damn....moose and elk are clearly in your future.

  6. #44
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    The wife and I did a bit of exploring today. We followed a stream for a few clicks looking for grayling (no luck) but I was also looking for hunting spots. Do deer tend to often stay down low near rivers and streams?

    We came across a few things I found interesting. I remember someone once saying to pay attention to ridges. I didn't climb up to the top of this ridge, but it piqued my interest for sure.





    We had been seeing a few tracks here and there, but nothing really fresh and not in any numbers. Then a little ways down stream we came across a muddy area with a large amount of tracks. I'm not exactly a pro at ageing tracks, but they looks relatively recent and there were plenty of them.





    So, is this a place I should start focusing some more effort on? Have I inadvertently found a travel corridor or does this look like a happenstance find?
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

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    Rory McCanuck (08-22-2020)

  8. #45
    Senior Member Camo tung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingHigh View Post
    The wife and I did a bit of exploring today. We followed a stream for a few clicks looking for grayling (no luck) but I was also looking for hunting spots. Do deer tend to often stay down low near rivers and streams?

    We came across a few things I found interesting. I remember someone once saying to pay attention to ridges. I didn't climb up to the top of this ridge, but it piqued my interest for sure.





    We had been seeing a few tracks here and there, but nothing really fresh and not in any numbers. Then a little ways down stream we came across a muddy area with a large amount of tracks. I'm not exactly a pro at ageing tracks, but they looks relatively recent and there were plenty of them.





    So, is this a place I should start focusing some more effort on? Have I inadvertently found a travel corridor or does this look like a happenstance find?
    Start with the tracks. Where do they come down out of the woods onto to the flats and where do they leave? You have come across part of a travel route that loops down to the water then continues. It could be a regular path or it could be as a result of the recent hot weather. Regardless it certainly bears more watching. Grab an tree branch next time and sweep over the tracks, especially if you'll be passing back thru the area in a couple days on another trip, or your way out of the area. New tracks will give you a bit of a timeline and a rough idea if it's visited often. Those ridges are much too steep to be a regular travel route for lazy deer moving to water however you will find well-worn elk paths down to the water (and mud) where you are. If you have stumbled on a regularly used travel route that ridge can be a great vantage point.

    The best news about your tracks...if you follow them long enough there will be an animal standing in the last ones! In a few short weeks you'll be seeing sign that isn't on the ground...IMG_0051.JPG

    This is not my tree cam pic but notice how the deer are feeding in the daylight just inside the tree line off the field? That type of topography is attractive to them. They can feed mid-day if they want to without exposing themselves. Your task 007 is to find that location in the area you're hunting and position yourself for the intercept. 28796081_1731892643564184_2650021819796422656_o.jpg
    "It is an absolute truism that law-abiding, armed citizens pose no threat to other law-abiding citizens."

    Ammo, camo and things that go "blammo".

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  10. #46
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camo tung View Post
    Start with the tracks. Where do they come down out of the woods onto to the flats and where do they leave? You have come across part of a travel route that loops down to the water then continues. It could be a regular path or it could be as a result of the recent hot weather. Regardless it certainly bears more watching. Grab an tree branch next time and sweep over the tracks, especially if you'll be passing back thru the area in a couple days on another trip, or your way out of the area. New tracks will give you a bit of a timeline and a rough idea if it's visited often. Those ridges are much too steep to be a regular travel route for lazy deer moving to water however you will find well-worn elk paths down to the water (and mud) where you are. If you have stumbled on a regularly used travel route that ridge can be a great vantage point.

    The best news about your tracks...if you follow them long enough there will be an animal standing in the last ones! In a few short weeks you'll be seeing sign that isn't on the ground...IMG_0051.JPG

    This is not my tree cam pic but notice how the deer are feeding in the daylight just inside the tree line off the field? That type of topography is attractive to them. They can feed mid-day if they want to without exposing themselves. Your task 007 is to find that location in the area you're hunting and position yourself for the intercept. 28796081_1731892643564184_2650021819796422656_o.jpg

    Awesome, thanks! It didn't even occur to me to wipe out the tracks. I'll do that next time. I did find where I think they came out of the bush. It's real thick back in there, maybe 10 - 15 yards of visual range. The tracks disappeared once they got out on the gravel area, so next time I'm there I'll check around on the other side of the stream and see if I can track down an exit point.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

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    Camo tung (08-22-2020), Rory McCanuck (08-23-2020)

  12. #47
    Senior Member Drache's Avatar
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    This is where game cameras come in really handy. We had a spot we called the "deer highway". So many deer tracks that you couldn't tell one deer from another, just a solid amount of tracks all going one way down an old logging road. We hunted that road for years and never seen a single deer leaving the tracks. Finally borrowed a friend's game cam and found out the deer were moving through at about 3-4am every morning. Never any later.

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    FlyingHigh (09-01-2020)

  14. #48
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Well, it's all turned out to be a pretty much moot point. My season is done before it really got started. Work and the economy have become so unstable that I just can't commit the time or money to another hobby right now.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

  15. #49
    Senior Member Macds's Avatar
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    My advise would be just get out and scout.
    Doesnt cost you much time or money to go talk to land owners, get permissions, and see where things are moving.
    Then you have a leg up for your first actual year of hunting.

  16. #50
    Untouchable FlyingHigh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Macds View Post
    My advise would be just get out and scout.
    Doesnt cost you much time or money to go talk to land owners, get permissions, and see where things are moving.
    Then you have a leg up for your first actual year of hunting.
    That's all gas money which I need to be saving right now. I'm also not hunting private land so I have to travel further afield too. I have no idea if I'll have a job in January. I'm basically at the point where all my hobbies are on indefinite hold.
    I'd rather make a difference than a dollar.

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