Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    SWOntario
    Posts
    2,720
    "...forked out $1000 + on a bow..." That's another thing. Decide on a budget first. Friggin' archery kit can be really, really expensive. I thought the $350 I spent on my compound 30 plus years ago was a lot until I looked at current prices. Especially arrows.
    I wouldn't think 'used' compound myself. You have no idea what the previous owner has done with it. For example, dry firing one can damage it.
    "...Recurve or compound?..." It takes more upper body tone to shoot a recurve well vs a compound. However, a recurve is easier to draw than a long bow. The poundage matters too. Last time I looked, Ontario requires a minimum of 40 pounds for deer. 48 pounds for moose. Dunno about birds. Either way, if you can't lift a 48 pound box easily, you won't be able to shoot a bow of that weight without hurting yourself either.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Camo tung's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    5,172
    The people that complain about the per round cost of premium rifle ammo should talk to a bow hunter. Try losing a carbon arrow with a quality broadhead...much more at stake than $2.50 per round.
    "It is an absolute truism that law-abiding, armed citizens pose no threat to other law-abiding citizens."

    Ammo, camo and things that go "blammo".

  3. #13
    Moderator kennymo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB
    Posts
    13,245
    Quote Originally Posted by Camo tung View Post
    The people that complain about the per round cost of premium rifle ammo should talk to a bow hunter. Try losing a carbon arrow with a quality broadhead...much more at stake than $2.50 per round.
    The neighbourhood range puts on a weekly 3-D shoot over the winter. He puts out some logs and tree limbs for the tougher shots, it’s good for arrow sales. I’ve lost a couple shooting over the log at a small target. Amazing how carbon fibre can just explode like that....
    Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.

  4. #14
    Bladesmith
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by kennymo View Post
    The neighbourhood range puts on a weekly 3-D shoot over the winter. He puts out some logs and tree limbs for the tougher shots, it’s good for arrow sales. I’ve lost a couple shooting over the log at a small target. Amazing how carbon fibre can just explode like that....
    Ain't that the truth. I like to rabbit hunt with a bow but there can't be any snow. An arrow can disappear under three snowflakes. When I use my recurve with blunts I don't break half the arrows.

  5. The Following 2 Users Like This Post By Brad

    Candychikita (09-05-2020), lone-wolf (09-05-2020)

  6. #15
    Token Female Moderator Candychikita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Fraser Valley
    Posts
    2,280
    Like Teach said, see if you can get into a lesson. We had a range of bows to try with tips and tricks to each.

    Compound has to be fitted to your arm length to make it comfortable for you, as if the cams turn over too late you get fatigue. With compound, each time you change the weight you have to set everything up again, so going target practice at 20# to hunting weight at 40#+ is a big deal (also a bit of a shock, so I dialed it up slowly to get to my desired poundage - practically gave myself a hernia cranking it up too fast). I did however very much like being able to change the weight to suit my needs. I would NOT buy a used compound unless it's been through a shop to look it over for safety but that's just me. I give my shops a lot of business bahahaha.

    If you're wanting to have fun and bomb around on targets I picked up a Kassai bow (https://www.horsebows.com/bows.php) These puppies are fantastic and lightweight. Been having a blast with this doing horseback archery. It is what it is, no bells and whistles. I fell in love with the shape. Note on these you're shooting off the hand, so you'll need a glove on your bow hand.

    I got a regular recurve that shoots left and right that I keep for company. No bells, no whistles. As long as you're anchoring your string properly and practice consistency you can get good. I found recurve boring after you get to know your bow. Recurve has a lot of guesswork in it and I suck at guesstimating distances, so me hunting with a recurve is out of the question. Compound I am able to draw and wait and aim like a gun with sights, and I set up my pegs to certain distances so I could practice gauging distance better.

    With your string hand, consider that you will fatigue your fingers and can cause nerve damage like Grizz said. I shoot in specific archery gloves these days because of the horsebow, or my compound I use a trigger/loop set up so I'm pulling with my wrist not my little fingers.

    Enjoy your hunt for your bow!
    Last edited by Candychikita; 09-05-2020 at 11:05 AM.

  7. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    SWOntario
    Posts
    2,720
    An arrow(that must be the right length for you) can disappear in thin grass too. And Al arrows can jam the insert into the shaft hitting a 2 x 4. $15 a pop for Al the last time I looked.
    "...unless it's been through a shop to look it over for safety..." That applies to fibreglas and other "stick" bows too. They can get twisted. Easier to tell though. Just draw the thing. If the string comes out of the groove the limb is twisted and the bow is toast.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •