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Thread: Inflation

  1. #321
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIR VEYOR View Post
    There are some jobs that are almost inherently fixed at certain price points relative to their position in the economy. Frequently when there is a strong “I’ll do it for less” competition factor, combined occasionally with a “I’m not paying that much” attitude. Trucking is one of those, for example. Trucking is also one where owner/operator is frequently an even worse proposition than being an employee.

    Painting could be one, but since they seem to charge less than you could just source supplies for alone, does not prove anything either way...
    And I'll bet those kinds of jobs: factory worker, warehouse worker, truck driver, painter, etc. are just the kinds of jobs that the constant waves of 3rd world migration are going to end up in. Those kind of lower-skilled jobs certainly have the potential to pay decently, but because of all the cheap labour constantly available, now have no reason to do so.

    And look how the Sikh community has a near monopoly on the trucking industry in Ontario. Did we really need to import all those hundreds of thousands of people?

    Does Brampton REALLY need to exist? Building an entire city from nothing, just for immigrants? That certainly doesn't benefit the nation, for sure.

    We developed an entire city out of farmland, NOT to alleviate some kind of housing shortage in the GTA, but rather to import huge numbers of migrants, and make the supply of housing EVEN WORSE.
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  3. #322
    Senior Member play.soccer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1917 Enfield View Post
    Well, according to the EU and UN we all need to eat more bugs now instead of carbon emitting greenhouse causing cattle!
    Just eat the bugs, bigot! Lol
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  5. #323
    Senior Member Gaidheal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by play.soccer View Post
    Just eat the bugs, bigot! Lol
    Some people pay big bucks for seabugs

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  7. #324
    Go Canucks Go! lone-wolf's Avatar
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    I was thinking about inflation, back in the 1900s you could tar and feather the tax collectors with just a bucket of tar and a bucket of feathers. Today you'd need an Olympic swimming pool of tar and of feathers to get all the tax collectors
    the wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept

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  9. #325
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Well the price of meat just went higher in the USA!

    And am I alone on this but does this feel like somebody has declared war on the USA now that Sleepy Joe is the pres?


    https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/...eef-production

    Updated on 12 hours ago

    JBS cyberattack forces shutdown all company's US beef plants

    Meat shortage in the US a concern following cyberattack

    Brazil-based JBS, the world's largest meat producer, has shuttered all of its US-based beef plants as of Tuesday while responding to a cyberattack.

    The shutdowns impacted all nine beef plants, located in Arizona, Texas, Nebraska, Colorado, Wisconsin, Utah, Michigan and Pennsylvania, according to officials from the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) International Union, which represents more than 25,000 JBS employees. JBS's US-based pork plants are still operational.

    The shuttered plants produce nearly one-quarter of U.S. beef supplies. In total, JBS employs more than 66,000 workers across 84 US-based locations.

    The attack raised concerns of a potential meat shortage in the U.S. and several other countries impacted by the situation. It wasn’t immediately clear how the shutdown would affect meat prices.

    JBS did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Bloomberg was first to report on the shutdowns.

    BIDEN ADMIN WARNS RUSSIA ‘RESPONSIBLE STATES’ AREN'T REFUGES FOR ‘RANSOMWARE CRIMINALS’ AFTER JBS ATTACK

    JBS USA said it discovered on Sunday that an "organized cybersecurity attack" had impacted some of its computer systems in North America and Australia. The company noted it would "take time" to resolve the cybersecurity breach and warned it "may delay certain transactions with customers and suppliers."

    UFCW called on the company to pay workers impacted by the plant shutdowns.

    "As the union for JBS meatpacking workers across the country, UFCW is pleased JBS is working around the clock to resolve this, and UFCW is urging JBS to ensure that all of its meatpacking workers receive their contractually guaranteed pay as these plant shutdowns continue," UFCW International President Marc Perrone said in a statement.

    JBS has yet to publicly disclose that it was targeted by a ransomware attack. The White House said it was aware of the situation and indicated a criminal group likely based in Russia was believed to be responsible.

    "JBS notified the administration that the ransom demand came from a criminal organization likely based in Russia. The White House is engaging directly with the Russian government on this matter and delivering the message that responsible states do not harbor ransomware criminals," White House principal deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said at a press briefing.
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  10. #326
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1917 Enfield View Post
    Well the price of meat just went higher in the USA!

    And am I alone on this but does this feel like somebody has declared war on the USA now that Sleepy Joe is the pres?
    Yeah probably... drawing any connection between gas pipelines getting shut down... BEEF processing plants getting shut down... with anything the globalists have ever said... on a daily basis... for years... is just delusion.
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  12. #327
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe6167 View Post
    And I'll bet those kinds of jobs: factory worker, warehouse worker, truck driver, painter, etc. are just the kinds of jobs that the constant waves of 3rd world migration are going to end up in. Those kind of lower-skilled jobs certainly have the potential to pay decently, but because of all the cheap labour constantly available, now have no reason to do so.

    And look how the Sikh community has a near monopoly on the trucking industry in Ontario. Did we really need to import all those hundreds of thousands of people?

    Does Brampton REALLY need to exist? Building an entire city from nothing, just for immigrants? That certainly doesn't benefit the nation, for sure.

    We developed an entire city out of farmland, NOT to alleviate some kind of housing shortage in the GTA, but rather to import huge numbers of migrants, and make the supply of housing EVEN WORSE.
    Not all positions would be considered “unskilled”. And it’s not due to immigrants taking jobs either. If anything, they’re more ambitious than current employees and willing to try freelance. There are lots of jobs where if you can float the startup costs for 30-90-120 days (1st invoice paid), you can run on a razor margin, say 1.1 instead of a typical 2.2 wage multiple. And all those companies that need 2.2ish due to their operations are either out of business or likely forced to suppress wages to compete. Can’t charge more, difficult to higher wages. Easy to price yourself out of the market rate. Pensions and company lifers didn’t leave because of immigrants.

    Look at large construction, used to be GC/CMT/etc supplies all the support services for the subs. Now, frequently each sub must supply their own support services. Why? Because the “support guys” kept getting undercut by small or 1 person operations. So less cohesion of the underlying backbone of the site, and less wages available for the support guys.

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  14. #328
    Senior Member chuckufarlie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe6167 View Post
    How the trucker shortage is fueling the meat crisis
    May 30, 2021
    https://nypost.com/2021/05/30/how-th...e-meat-crisis/

    Meat lovers are paying through the nose for their favorite cuts — and a raging trucker shortage is increasingly to blame, The Post has learned.

    The cost of a summer BBQ starring boneless ribeye steak, for example, cost an average of $12.37 a pound last week, up from $9.75 the prior week, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

    St. Louis style spareribs, meanwhile, cost $3.82 a pound last week, up from $2.77 the week prior, the USDA data said.

    While the skyrocketing price of corn feed – used to fatten animals – has been widely reported to be fueling the price hikes, sources say the dearth of truckers is a big factor as well.

    “The driver shortage is pushing the entire pricing system up,” said Daniel Romanoff, president of Nebraskaland, a meat distributor in the Bronx.

    In a desperate attempt to hire drivers, Nebraskaland has taken to recruiting them at local fueling stations — distributing flyers that shout, “ATTENTION PLEASE!,” next to a picture of a hand holding a bullhorn.

    The flyers offer $4,000 bonuses to new hires after 90 days on the job, and $4,000 to existing Nebraskaland drivers who refer workers to the company. Nebraskaland is offering a similar $2,000 incentive to recruit warehouse workers along with a $2,000 referral bonus for its employees who recruit workers to the company.

    Meat wholesaler Baldor Specialty Food, also based in the Bronx, has taken a slightly different tact. Last month it plastered an ad on the Bruckner Expressway — a major thoroughfare for truckers — boasting $3,000 signing bonuses for new drivers.

    The driver shortage has many meat wholesales suffering on both ends — enduring long delays in getting their orders fulfilled and then struggling to get their products to supermarkets and restaurants.

    WestSide Foods, for example, is now waiting five days – up from three — for its wholesale orders to get to its Bronx warehouse, according to Shawn Reid, vice president of sales.

    This and other supply chain factors are all contributing to what Reid called “the longest sustained spike in meat prices in my 35 years in this business.”

    While fears of the coronavirus continue to keep some people home, employers say generous unemployment benefits, including $300 weekly checks from the federal government, are also to blame.

    “The $300 weekly unemployment checks is a terrific program for those who really need it but it is a deterrent for people to come back to the workforce,” Romanoff said.

    “We have heard indirectly from our current employees that their friends and acquaintances who have trucking licenses and have opted not to work right now,” he said.

    The pain of rising meat prices will arguably be felt most acutely by lower income people and residents in cities far from cattle country, like NYC.

    Indeed, Sal Bonavita, who owns two Key Food stores in the Bronx, has largely stopped carrying rib meat, including ribeye steaks and ribs, because he now has to charge customers $16 a pound up from $12.

    “It’s no longer economically viable for us to offer rib steak,” Bonavita told The Post.

    Bonavita brought in some rib meat for the Memorial Day weekend for customers who asked for it, but expects to take a loss on it because most of his customers — a diverse group of immigrants from Latin America, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe and the Middle East — cannot afford it.

    “If they are coming in with a $50 budget, that $50 is buying less today,” he said.

    It’s not just ribs. Before the pandemic, Bonavita was able to offer sales on chicken cutlets for $1.99 a pound. But he recently had to raise his lowest sale price by $1.

    His chuck meat prices had been $3.99 per pound, but recently went up to $5.29 per pound — and is likely going up to $5.99 per pound, he said.

    The pain is especially acute for lower-income customers, he said. “We are seeing a shift from red meat to chicken from our customers who receive federal assistance,” Bonavita said.
    Hmmmm... if there is a trucker shortage, and I have a valid AZ license and driving experience, can I get a green card as a truck driver?

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  16. #329
    Senior Member CLW .45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckufarlie View Post
    Hmmmm... if there is a trucker shortage, and I have a valid AZ license and driving experience, can I get a green card as a truck driver?
    A work permit, if the employer supports the request, certainly.

    A green card, perhaps.
    Gun Control is about making it unlawful for you to use, carry, or possess a firearm.

    All restrictions/prohibitions on the use, carriage, or possession of firearms must be repealed.

    Middle ground?

    What middle ground?

  17. #330
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    A couple of things:
    -Inflation acknowledged to be near 2008 levels
    -Russia is getting rid of its US Dollars
    -Demands for more stimulus (UBI)
    -Federal Reserve discontinuing weekly release of money supply data



    Russia Cuts Dollar Holdings From $119 Billion Wealth Fund Amid Sanctions
    June 3, 2021
    https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/ru...100449669.html

    Russia said it will eliminate the dollar from its oil fund to reduce vulnerability to Western sanctions just two weeks before President Vladimir Putin holds his first summit meeting with U.S. leader Joe Biden.

    The National Wellbeing Fund will shift its dollar holdings into euros, yuan and gold, Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said.

    The dollar pared gains on the news Thursday before bouncing back as analysts said the immediate market impact is likely to be limited. The transfer, which affects about $119 billion in liquid assets of which about a third is held in dollars, will take place within the central bank’s huge reserves.

    “The central bank can make these changes to the Wellbeing Fund without resorting to market operations,” said Sofya Donets, economist at Renaissance Capital in Moscow.

    Coming ahead of the June 16 Biden-Putin meeting, the move marks another milestone in the Russian leader’s drive to reduce his country’s dependence on the dollar after years of steadily increasing U.S. restrictions.

    “They’re expanding sanctions and for us, the dollar is becoming riskier,” Deputy Finance Minister Vladimir Kolychev told Bloomberg.

    Russia can make the change within a month, but it’s up to the central bank to determine whether to adjust the distribution of its overall reserve holdings, Siluanov told reporters at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum.

    “This decision is logical in the context of the stubborn standoff with the U.S.,” said Oleg Vyugin, a former senior central bank official. “But in terms of risk/return, exiting dollar assets to replace them with the ones they list is most likley to be economically unattractive.”

    While it will have “no initial market impact,” the move will probably lead the central bank to sell dollars ultimately, said Jordan Rochester, currency strategist at Nomura International PLC. “It’s not clear how quickly they will do it.”

    There could be market impact if the central bank sells its remaining holdings of U.S. treasuries, he added.

    The wealth fund currently holds 35% of its liquid assets in dollars, worth about $41.5 billion, with the same amount in euros and the rest spread across yuan, gold, yen and pounds.

    After the change, the fund’s assets will be held 40% in euros, 30% in yuan, 20% in gold and 5% each in yen and pounds, Siluanov said.

    The central bank doesn’t comment on plans for its foreign-exchange reserves. “Of course, the currency structure of the government’s reserves is one of the factors we take into account,” Bank of Russia Governor Elvira Nabiullina said, according to Interfax.

    The wealth fund holds savings from Russia’s oil revenues above a cutoff price and is used to help offset shortfalls when the market falls below that level. Together with illiquid assets, its total value is $185.9 billion. With the economy recovering faster than expected, the budget deficit will be 1% of gross domestic product this year, Siluanov said, narrower than the 2.4% initially planned.

    The central bank reports the currency distribution of its reserves with a six-month lag, declining to provide information on its current holdings.
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