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  1. #21
    Canadian ForcesMember 6MT's Avatar
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    So I loaded up a couple of different charge weights with the Titegroup powder. One at 6.8gr and the other at 7.0gr. We'll see if I can actually feel a difference. And also see a difference in accuracy with the 125gr pills.

    I must say, I've never charged that small an amount of powder. As I mentioned above, I was at first concerned that there seemed to be less then 1/3 filled in the case. But everyone's responses here and other places have my concerns lowered. It was such a small throw, that my AutoTrickler wouldn't do a throw below about 9 grains of that consistency of powder. So....out came the dipping cup. A 5cc cup would throw around 5.5gr and the Autotrickler would trickle up the remainder.

    I found the Titegroup meters wonderfully. The best of any powder I've tried. Then....I came back to earth and loaded a hundred cases of .223 with....Varget.
    Last edited by 6MT; 03-12-2021 at 03:45 PM.

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    Rory McCanuck (03-13-2021)

  3. #22
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    I find that my Lee Perfect Powder measure meters Titegroup very well. I check about every 10th or so charges and it’s a rare thing when I find one that’s off.
    It’s a pretty cheap option if you are bulk loading pistol rounds.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6MT View Post
    So I loaded up a couple of different charge weights with the Titegroup powder. One at 6.8gr and the other at 7.0gr. We'll see if I can actually feel a difference. And also see a difference in accuracy with the 125gr pills.

    I must say, I've never charged that small an amount of powder. As I mentioned above, I was at first concerned that there seemed to be less then 1/3 filled in the case. But everyone's responses here and other places have my concerns lowered. It was such a small throw, that my AutoTrickler wouldn't do a throw below about 9 grains of that consistency of powder. So....out came the dipping cup. A 5cc cup would throw around 5.5gr and the Autotrickler would trickle up the remainder.

    I found the Titegroup meters wonderfully. The best of any powder I've tried. Then....I came back to earth and loaded a hundred cases of .223 with....Varget.
    When I was still doing loads with my partner press I had rbcs power measure, I had to switch to a small metering rod so I could go low enough for the titegroup. I originally had got it for large throws with 296.

    I feel your pain.

    Corey

  5. #24
    Canadian ForcesMember 6MT's Avatar
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    Well...they all went bang. Seems to be a cleaner powder too. I like the lighter weight charge better. In fact I’m going to load down from 6.8gr to 6.5gr. I have been told on the CAS forum, that you can take Titegroup with this bullet down to around 3.5gr safely. I won’t be going down that low unless I buy another revolver to match this and a rig to hold them, and go into competition. Nope. Not happening. (maybe)

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    IJ22 (03-13-2021)

  7. #25
    Senior Member chuckbuster's Avatar
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    I'm all over the map when it comes to powders for .357 magnum. I've used 2400 primarily, some Accurate Arms, a little bit of W296/H110 and a few others I've probably forgotten. For whatever reason, I can't settle on one powder; unlike .38 special for which I tend to use 1 powder for years at a time, then switch to try something different for a while. Right now, Titegroup is my go to for .38 special.
    Magua took the hatchet to colour with blood...It is still bright.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckbuster View Post
    I'm all over the map when it comes to powders for .357 magnum. I've used 2400 primarily, some Accurate Arms, a little bit of W296/H110 and a few others I've probably forgotten. For whatever reason, I can't settle on one powder; unlike .38 special for which I tend to use 1 powder for years at a time, then switch to try something different for a while. Right now, Titegroup is my go to for .38 special.
    I have also been all over the map with my 357 and 38. Titegroup, HS6 etc. Didn't like the snap verses a push with the Titegroup. Didn't like the HS6 for the dirtyness. Finally settled on Vihtavouri N320 under 148gr Campro HBWC for the 38. Using Vihtavouri N340 for the 37 with 158gr DRG SWCs. Both powders are very clean, stupidly accurate and meter very well in the Dillon 550C powder measure. In fact, my scale measures to 0.02gr accuracy and I am always no more than +/- 0.02gr difference on my powder drops.

  9. #27
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Single based powder burn cooler than double based powders too.

    Double base powders(nitroglycerin added) do produce higher velocities but can burn hotter and lead to more throat erosion , where as single base powders (nitrocellulose only) will generally be easier on throat wear.

    The benefits from double-base are the increased energy; greater load density possible as the N-G treatment adds weight so that you can pack a heavier weight charge into a volume-limited case for any given kernel size/configuration; longer shelf life as D-B powders tend to only deteriorate very slowly in storage.

    Downsides are increased cost (sometimes) and increased flame temperatures - but only if not treated by the manufacturer to avoid this occurrence. Also, in my experience, some examples such as the Viht N500 series can be 'stickier' than the base S-B N100 version so don't meter as accurately in powder measures.

    Every ball powder on the market is D-B as are all Alliant Reloader series rifle powders.

    Double-base powders have a flatter pressure curve: the nitroglycerin burns quicker, and the nitrocellulose slower. This can be used in two different ways. Loaded to the same muzzle velocity, peak pressure is reduced and with it peak temperature. Loaded to the same peak pressure, muzzle velocity is increased due to the extended burn. If you go for the velocity increase you pay a price in throat erosion since the peak pressure is maintained longer; however, if you load for the same velocity erosion is generally reduced since peak pressure and temperature are lower. There's no free lunch - you can't have it both ways.
    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

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    6MT (03-15-2021), YQR Reloader (03-15-2021)

  11. #28
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    Thanks M1917 Enfield for your input on this thread. I've been reloading for about 4 years now and by my records, I just exceeded 96,000 rounds, primarily pistol rounds. Your more in-depth information is what I appreciate in my journey on learning more on reloading.

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    M1917 Enfield (03-15-2021), Rory McCanuck (03-16-2021)

  13. #29
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Thought I would add this picture to this thread as it shows that even S&W now does not approve of light bullet .357mag loads in some of the revolvers due to the increased flame cutting and danger of it causing irreparable damage to some of their guns, they have started to add this warning to their air lite revolvers -











    Note that even S&W now states no less than a 120gr bullet to be used in this .357 magnum revolver for fear of rapid gas frame cutting.

    This revolver while light and handy is only made from scandium and titanium and is much more susceptible to rapid gas flame cutting than all steel framed revolvers, but even they will experience elevated gas flame frame cutting from regular use, just not enough to cause this without many thousand of such rounds fired -











    Even the titanium cylinders on this revolver do not like excessive gas flames from light .357mag loads.


    110gr 357mag loads are the worse for excessive flame gas cutting -









    This is from a steel cylinder Brazilian Taurus .357 mag revolver feed a steady diet of light bullet Hornady Critical Defense .357 Magnum 125gr loads -


    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

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    YQR Reloader (06-11-2021)

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1917 Enfield View Post
    Thought I would add this picture to this thread as it shows that even S&W now does not approve of light bullet .357mag loads in some of the revolvers due to the increased flame cutting and danger of it causing irreparable damage to some of their guns, they have started to add this warning to their air lite revolvers -











    Note that even S&W now states no less than a 120gr bullet to be used in this .357 magnum revolver for fear of rapid gas frame cutting.

    This revolver while light and handy is only made from scandium and titanium and is much more susceptible to rapid gas flame cutting than all steel framed revolvers, but even they will experience elevated gas flame frame cutting from regular use, just not enough to cause this without many thousand of such rounds fired -











    Even the titanium cylinders on this revolver do not like excessive gas flames from light .357mag loads.


    110gr 357mag loads are the worse for excessive flame gas cutting -









    This is from a steel cylinder Brazilian Taurus .357 mag revolver feed a steady diet of light bullet Hornady Critical Defense .357 Magnum 125gr loads -


    Just like a plasma cutter!

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