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Thread: Mmmmm... BACON!

  1. #51
    Part-Timer Grizz Axxemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    A great bacon making YouTube video just got uploaded a couple of days ago by The Butcher Boys.

    They do comparisons between celery powder and nitrite cures. Then they compare cured bacon only and with rubs including pepper. They put the pepper on the slab just before it goes into the smoker. The rub application is at the 15:30 mark.
    I watched this one earlier today before I even looked at GOC. Wifey was asking me why I was willing to kill an hour watching a video on making bacon. "To make better bacon!"

    I will say this: I think I prefer using the Prague Powder #1 and doing the dry EQ method.
    Yes, you can fix stupid, but the stupid folks have passed laws against it. - FallisCowboy

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz Axxemann View Post
    I watched this one earlier today before I even looked at GOC. Wifey was asking me why I was willing to kill an hour watching a video on making bacon. "To make better bacon!"

    I will say this: I think I prefer using the Prague Powder #1 and doing the dry EQ method.
    The Butcher Boys video using the wet curing technique was a new one for me. I really liked the finished curing results at the end with this technique. However, the wet method could be limiting to a lot of bacon makers because of refrigeration space when using larger totes.

    I am with you on the EQ method which is what I do. I can easily do up 5 - 5 pound slabs, put in doubled up extra large zip-lock bags and stuff them in the fridge. The curing results look similar to the shown wet cure method. The big thing is to really perfect your smoking techniques to get that best taste of heaven.

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    Grizz Axxemann (05-09-2021)

  4. #53
    Part-Timer Grizz Axxemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    The Butcher Boys video using the wet curing technique was a new one for me. I really liked the finished curing results at the end with this technique. However, the wet method could be limiting to a lot of bacon makers because of refrigeration space when using larger totes.

    I am with you on the EQ method which is what I do. I can easily do up 5 - 5 pound slabs, put in doubled up extra large zip-lock bags and stuff them in the fridge. The curing results look similar to the shown wet cure method. The big thing is to really perfect your smoking techniques to get that best taste of heaven.
    That's why I opted for Dry EQ. My fridge isn't very big. Just to get a 4L ice cream bucket for the back bacon in the fridge was a bunch of rearranging. There are plenty of other vids out there showing Dry EQ, it's just a matter of searching. The greenish tinge from the celery powder would put me off. Meat is supposed to be pink, not green. And bet your bottom dollar it stays pink when in a vac bag.

    I'm getting better at dialing in my smoke. Since I'm using a kettle grill for now (I have desires to upgrade to a Gravity Fed... either MasterBuilt or Char Griller) I made the switch to briquettes for more even heat when smoking. Hot cooks like chicken, steaks, burgers still get done over lump.
    Yes, you can fix stupid, but the stupid folks have passed laws against it. - FallisCowboy

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz Axxemann View Post
    That's why I opted for Dry EQ. My fridge isn't very big. Just to get a 4L ice cream bucket for the back bacon in the fridge was a bunch of rearranging. There are plenty of other vids out there showing Dry EQ, it's just a matter of searching. The greenish tinge from the celery powder would put me off. Meat is supposed to be pink, not green. And bet your bottom dollar it stays pink when in a vac bag.

    I'm getting better at dialing in my smoke. Since I'm using a kettle grill for now (I have desires to upgrade to a Gravity Fed... either MasterBuilt or Char Griller) I made the switch to briquettes for more even heat when smoking. Hot cooks like chicken, steaks, burgers still get done over lump.
    The process I use for smoking the cured slabs in the Sausage Maker smoker is:
    - 1 hr at 110 F to get rid of any surface dampness
    - 3 hr at 130 F to prep slab surface for smoking
    - 3 hr at 150 F applying the cherry wood smoke
    - 5 hr at 170 F to get 152 F internal

    I know it is a long process but it works for me making bacon and also sausages. Usually a bit tipsy after the smoking/cooking day. Always get good results. Got the technique from a VHS smoking tape I got years ago. Some old guy that's some kind of expert. Piss poor video quality, he is dry as hell but packed with information. Got the tape lying around somewhere but I wouldn't embarrass myself saying that I have a VHS player around to play it.

    With you on the lump charcoal for hot cooking. Do it in my Big Green Egg.

    Also, when I looked at how I entitled the posted video, I call a Butchers Boys video. I meant to say The Bearded Butchers. I was at a local butcher store earlier that day called Butcher Boy Meats so I had a brain fart.

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    Grizz Axxemann (05-10-2021)

  7. #55
    Part-Timer Grizz Axxemann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    The process I use for smoking the cured slabs in the Sausage Maker smoker is:
    - 1 hr at 110 F to get rid of any surface dampness
    - 3 hr at 130 F to prep slab surface for smoking
    - 3 hr at 150 F applying the cherry wood smoke
    - 5 hr at 170 F to get 152 F internal

    I know it is a long process but it works for me making bacon and also sausages. Usually a bit tipsy after the smoking/cooking day. Always get good results. Got the technique from a VHS smoking tape I got years ago. Some old guy that's some kind of expert. Piss poor video quality, he is dry as hell but packed with information. Got the tape lying around somewhere but I wouldn't embarrass myself saying that I have a VHS player around to play it.
    If I could keep clean smoke that low down, I would. The way my kettle behaves the lowest I can go and run clean is about 225-230, and that's a pain in the ass. I normally do ribs and butts around 280. That's where my kettle seems happiest.

    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    With you on the lump charcoal for hot cooking. Do it in my Big Green Egg.
    I looked into a kamado for the longest time. Expensive, and heavy. But then again, so is a gravity feed.

    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    Also, when I looked at how I entitled the posted video, I call a Butchers Boys video. I meant to say The Bearded Butchers. I was at a local butcher store earlier that day called Butcher Boy Meats so I had a brain fart.
    I knew what you were talking about, so it's no big deal.
    Yes, you can fix stupid, but the stupid folks have passed laws against it. - FallisCowboy

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    YQR Reloader (Yesterday)

  9. #56
    Junior Member KayBur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YQR Reloader View Post
    The process I use for smoking the cured slabs in the Sausage Maker smoker is:
    - 1 hr at 110 F to get rid of any surface dampness
    - 3 hr at 130 F to prep slab surface for smoking
    - 3 hr at 150 F applying the cherry wood smoke
    - 5 hr at 170 F to get 152 F internal

    I know it is a long process but it works for me making bacon and also sausages. Usually a bit tipsy after the smoking/cooking day. Always get good results.
    After all, you cook for yourself and your family, which means that you must make an effort, cook slowly, in order to get perfectly cooked, juicy and aromatic meat.

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