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  1. #51
    Senior Member Grimlock's Avatar
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    If you spend less than 2 grand on a firearm now you can count on it basically being a kit. The '92 is a 130 year old design that wasn't designed with modern manufacturing in mind. No matter who makes it, there are some inherent quirks in the design. Having to stand on your left foot and whistle while you load the magazine is not one of them.

  2. #52
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimlock View Post
    If you spend less than 2 grand on a firearm now you can count on it basically being a kit. The '92 is a 130 year old design that wasn't designed with modern manufacturing in mind. No matter who makes it, there are some inherent quirks in the design. Having to stand on your left foot and whistle while you load the magazine is not one of them.
    Part of the reason old style Lever Action rifles are expensive today compared to cheaper bolt actions is that there is more complex milling and manufacturing involved in making them, when they first came out that was acceptable because they were the citizens only high capacity tactical assault rifles of their time well over 100 years ago when everybody else was using single shot rifles or much slower 5 shot bolt actions.
    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious and jovial behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

  3. #53
    Senior Member GTW's Avatar
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    All I know is this .357 should be arriving this week:
    B7D7D83F-66F3-4273-AF30-8D9339B1F628.jpg
    Justin Trudeau - living proof that shit can step in itself.

  4. The Following 5 Users Like This Post By GTW

    ESnel (01-17-2022), kennymo (01-16-2022), lone-wolf (01-17-2022), Rory McCanuck (01-17-2022), Stew (01-17-2022)

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  6. #55
    Senior Member oilman28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big-Boss-Man View Post
    Oh that Winchester is tempting. So is the one they have in 45 colt though...

  7. #56
    Senior Member labradort's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimlock View Post
    I tore down my Rossi when I got it and removed some burrs. It runs great and is accurate. It is not super high quality, but it wasn't priced that way. The design is prone to spitting out a cartdridge once in a while, and it doesn't matter who made it. Mine was made after Rossi went to modern tooling, so the older ones could have been sketchy. That was a long time ago now.
    This could be a factor: when was the rifle produced. So many stories like it: e.g. Marlins, or the Ruger Mini-14 have a reputation that haunts them but it's really a certain period of production that's associated with the QA variability or production set up. One might need to study the forums around R92 or other models to figure out the safer bet.

  8. #57
    Senior Member M1917 Enfield's Avatar
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    From eminent Model 92 sources in the USA:



    Some Rossi history.

    From about 1968-74 Garcia Corp. of Washington DC imported Rossi firearms (handguns, rifles and shotguns).

    Firearms International of Washington DC also imported Rossi in the 1960ís.

    In 1975 the "made in Brazil" marked Rossi 92 was imported by InterArms of Alexandria VA.

    InterArms was the first to market the Rossi made 92 as their "Puma" model.

    These earlier Rossi 92ís were decent moderately priced guns, but, by the late 80's and through the 90's they were really getting rough.

    The over 100 year old machinery was getting worn out, so the parts were becoming poorly fitted and rather than hand fit they were rough with burrs and terribly over sprung.

    Rossiís philosophy was at the time to make the parts slightly too big then, to compensate for the worn manufacturing machinery rather than take the time and effort to hand fit them, so just use excessively heavy springs and hoped that through owner use they would wear in.

    This saved many man-hours that keeps the then prices low, much lower than anybody else at the time could make them.

    When you picked up one of these guns, even before it was loaded, they felt very stiff right out of the box.

    Because of this, these earlier guns Rossi got a bad rep, which drove the "Model 92 gunsmithing" business (The CAS game was growing big time but the availability of guns for the game was limited and Rossi's became very popular as their steel used was still first rate).

    About 1999 Samuel Cummings, the owner of InterArms, passed away.

    The "understanding" was that his heirs didn't care to continue with the operation of InterArms, so the firearms stock on hand was sold off at a reduced price.

    In reality, Samuel Cummings died, and his daughter/heir ended up in jail about a year later.

    It's unknown whether it was a case of her not wanting to continue operating the business or the government preferring InterArms close it's doors.

    If you read up on the early history of Cummings and Interarms you'll get a feel for why the Govt might have wanted the company to die with him.

    In any case Rossi then created "Braztech" as the North American importer for Rossi firearms about 4 months before Sam Cummings died - which indicates that Interarms was already on it's way out as the major Rossi importer for North America.

    About that same time period, Rossi sold off their gallery gun, the pump 62 and the revolvers to Taurus, so some folks thought there would be no more Rossi 92's available. (Rossi did later bring back their .22LR pump action model 62 as Taurus did not want to produce it and public demand was still very strong)

    Also about this time (Y2K), Rossi completely re-tooled their old and over 100 year old and worn-out machinery with all new CNC machinery. The 1889 still family run company is about 130 years old.

    This new machinery has allowed them to make much better fitting parts. (they did still use their older parts in some guns until all old inventory was used up)

    There are still some that are a bit over-sprung, but overall the current guns are much nicer and far better quality than the pre-Y2K Rossi Model 92ís.

    Again, about this same time, Navy Arms started importing the Rossi 92's.

    Not long afterward, the ex-employees of InterArms started up Legacy Sports International (LSI) and they also began importing the Rossi 92, designating their Model 92's with their "Puma" trademarked name.

    These were the first to have the ugly bolt top safety. They brought it in because their lawyers advised it was necessary to cover any potential future lawsuits from poor user safe operation.

    (Before LSI moved to Reno, NV, the firm was located in the same old Interarms building.)

    During the late 90ís, EMF imported Armi San Marco Italian made 92's clones (ASM's) and had contracted to do the US warranty work on their guns.

    ASM's QC was so bad EMF sought out US-based assistance, they also decided the Rossi 92's should also be spec-ed for import as their EMF Hartford 92.

    (From about 2000 to 2006 the EMF imported Rossi 92's did not have the ugly lawyer requested bolt top safety, but added the feature until 2009.)

    Around 2008, LSI stopped sourcing it's Model 92 "Puma" from Rossi, and started importing only Model 92's made by Armi Sport/Chiappa (Italy).

    More recently, around 2009, Rossi and Taurus (a listed stock bearing public company) entered a manufacturing agreement where Taurus purchased the rights to four .38 Special and three .357 Magnum models of Rossi handguns.

    Taurus continues to make them under contract in Brazil on Rossi supplied tooling in their own plant.

    In turn, Taurus also makes the handguns that Braztech sells in North American under the Rossi name.

    Otherwise the rest of the Rossi lineup is still made by and the company is still controlled by Rossi (Still a family owned business).

    (IOW, Taurus isn't making the 92, Rossi still makes them and the sag in quality assurance belongs to Rossi.)

    The confusion is understandable - ask any gun shop in the country which company's firearms have the most issues from the factory, they'll all tell you "Taurus" with no need to even think about it.

    In 2009 Taurus acquired Rossi handguns and revolvers but not the long arms like the model 92's which are distributed as Rossi Model 92's under the Rossi owned Braztech name.

    Both EMF and LSI lost their deal with Rossi, once the Taurus deal took place.

    LSI now carries the Armi Sport/Chiappa 92 (and other Winchester clone leverguns), still carrying the "Puma" model name they own.

    The Rossi 92's are still made by Rossi but imported by Braztech which is also used by Taurus USA of Florida to import Taurus handguns.

    The bottom line is the post 2000 Model 92's have been pretty nice, probably because the various importers and buyers demanded it and of course the new CNC manufacturing machinery.

    Although, since Taurus bought Rossi handguns, there's been some decline in fit/finish, but the guns are still better than the late 90's old machinery handguns.
    Warning! some sarcasm, facetious and jovial behavior, satire, irony, dry humor, playful banter and more may or may not be involved in my postings. Please read anything I have written as being said in the most joyful and happy voice you can imagine.

    To whom it may concern: I hereby declare I am not responsible for the debts incurred by one Justin Trudeau!

  9. #58
    Senior Member GTW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oilman28 View Post
    Oh that Winchester is tempting. So is the one they have in 45 colt though...
    Oilman, Reliable has a Winchester 1892 large loop lever in 357 mag in stock:
    https://www.reliablegun.com/en/winch...rn-rear-sights

    as well as a Winchester 1892 Short Lever in 45 Colt as well:
    https://www.reliablegun.com/en/winch...rn-rear-sights
    Justin Trudeau - living proof that shit can step in itself.

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  11. #59
    Senior Member oilman28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTW View Post
    Oilman, Reliable has a Winchester 1892 large loop lever in 357 mag in stock:
    https://www.reliablegun.com/en/winch...rn-rear-sights

    as well as a Winchester 1892 Short Lever in 45 Colt as well:
    https://www.reliablegun.com/en/winch...rn-rear-sights
    Thanks. Those are actually pretty good prices. Now to decide on a caliber and see if I can actually find ammo.

  12. #60

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